Home News U.S. Secretary of state John Kerry meets with GEJ, Buhari over non-violent...

U.S. Secretary of state John Kerry meets with GEJ, Buhari over non-violent election

205
0
SHARE

In a rare high-level visit to Africa’s most populous country, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Sunday urged Nigeria’s leading presidential candidates to refrain from fomenting violence after next month’s vote, and he condemned savage attacks by Boko Haram, an al-Qaida-linked insurgency.

On a day when Nigerian troops battled extremists who attacked Maiduguri, the biggest city in the northeast, Kerry played down reports that the U.S. had grown frustrated with Nigeria’s military commitment to fighting the radical Islamist movement.

Kerry said the U.S. was sharing intelligence with Nigeria and stood ready to do more if the Feb. 14 election proceeded in a nonviolent, democratic fashion.

“The United States is deeply engaged with Nigeria,” he said. “Does it always work as well as we would like or as well as the Nigerians would like? The answer is no.”

President Goodluck Jonathan said he reaffirmed a strong commitment to working with the United States “to put an end to global terrorism and particularly Boko Haram.”

“I firmly believe that enhancing and expanding various channels of cooperation between our two countries, in the context of growing international coordination, are of the utmost importance,” Jonathan said in a statement following the meeting. “I discussed a number of ideas with Secretary Kerry to move such cooperation forward.”

Kerry was in the Nigeria’s commercial capital, Lagos, about 1,000 miles southwest from the skirmishes that killed more than 200 combatants.

Independent analysts have condemned the government’s tactics against Boko Haram, arguing that they inspire support for a movement driven by joblessness, alienation, ethnic divisions and poor governance.

Speaking at the U.S. consulate’s residence overlooking the Gulf of Guinea, Kerry told reporters that America and others will closely watch the election in this country of 170 million people.

“This will be the largest democratic election on the continent,” Kerry said. “Given the stakes, it’s absolutely critical that these elections be conducted peacefully — that they are credible, transparent and accountable.”

Kerry spoke after meeting in separate locations with both leading candidates, President Goodluck Jonathan and Muhammadu Buhari, the former military dictator whom Jonathan defeated in 2011. More than 800 people were killed in northern protests after Buhari, a Muslim northerner, lost to Jonathan, a Christian from the south.

On terrorism, Kerry said he was concerned about the Islamic State group making inroads in Africa, but said he saw no direct link between those Syria- and Iraq-based militants and Boko Haram.

In a report last week, the Virginia-based Center for Naval Analyses, a federally funded research corporation, called Boko Haram a locally focused insurgency largely fueled by bad government.

“The conflict is being sustained by masses of unemployed youth who are susceptible to Boko Haram recruitment, an alienated and frightened northern population that refuses to cooperate with state security forces, and a governance vacuum that has allowed the emergence of militant sanctuaries in the northeast,” the report said.

“The conflict is also being perpetuated by the Nigerian government, which has employed a heavy-handed, overwhelmingly (military) approach to dealing with the group and has paid little attention to the underlying contextual realities and root causes of the conflict,” the report said. That view comports with the assessment of the U.S. intelligence agencies.

This is the first time a chief American diplomat is visiting the country since 2012.

State Department officials are quoted as saying that Mr. Kerry will hold separate talks with President Jonathan and his leading opponent, Mr.  Buhari, a former Army general.

The secretary of state previously has paid similar visits to countries struggling with instability including Lebanon in 2009 and Iraq in 2005.

Briefing reporters Saturday, senior state department officials were quoted to have said Mr. Kerry will appeal to Mr. Jonathan and Mr. Buhari to accept the result of the Feb. 14 election and instruct their supporters to refrain from violence.

A dispute over President Jonathan’s emergence in 2011 had sparked riots in some states in Northern Nigeria that resulted in the death of people including Bauchi, Kaduna and Kano.

The country’s election is coming amid an increasing attacks and kidnappings and destruction by Boko Haram insurgents especially in North-east Nigeria.

Source: Yahoonews/PremiumTimes

Facebook Comments

comments

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.